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Elimination

Cages and repellent (patience required) are the only ways to deal with unwanted chipmunks. You can rent cages at our head office store .

We recommend using peanut butter as bait in addition to an apple wedge to prevent the animal from becoming dehydrated. Following capture, the creature should be moved at least 15 to 20 km away before being released so as to avoid its return.

Actions

  • Capture animals with a wildlife trap designed for that purpose
  • Release animals at least 20 km away

Prevention

  • Block off the space under sheds, porches, and other structures
  • Use a squirrel-proof bird feeder for feeding birds

Description and development

Chipmunks are small, solitary, diurnal rodents known to be very territorial. They are reddish brown with two white stripes bordered by black on their sides and one black stripe down the middle of their back.

The chipmunk mating season runs from mid-March to April and, when conditions are favorable, a second one takes place from mid-June to July. Gestation lasts 32 days and females give birth to litters of 4 or 5 young.
In addition to humans, many animals prey on chipmunks including dogs, cats, weasels, ermines, foxes, lynxes, raccoons, and hawks. Chipmunks can live 3 to 4 years in the wild and 5 to 8 years in captivity.

Habits

Chipmunks live in forests, on the edges of fields, and in bushes near homes. They reside in burrows with 1 or 2 tunnels about 5 cm in diameter. These tunnels lead to a main chamber carpeted with leaves and grass where they hibernate from late October to early March.

For the most part, chipmunks are granivores, feeding mainly on seeds, fruits, nuts, and herbaceous plants but also slugs, worms, grasshoppers, eggs, and even chicks. They use their cheek pouches to carry food back to their burrows, which they then store as provisions. This habit can, however, become problematic when they choose an attic as their hiding spot, as insects are drawn to their stores of nuts and seeds.

Photo published with the authorization of photographer Bruno Presumey

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